About

The Quantum Shorts competition has run annually since 2012, calling for creative content that draws inspiration from quantum physics

This year's competition is seeking flash fiction - stories no longer than 1000 words - inspired by the quantum world. On this website you can find resources to inspire your writing, instructions on how to enter, the contest rules, information about the judges and, last but not least, stories to read!

The 2015 competition launched on 16 September 2015 and will close to entries at 11:59:59 PM US Eastern Time on 1 December 2015.

“Quantum physics seems to inspire creative minds, so we can’t wait to see what this year’s contest will bring,” says Scientific American Editor in Chief and competition judge Mariette DiChristina.

The contest is organised by the Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT) in Singapore and supported by Media Partners and Scientific Partners.

The quantum world offers lots of scope for enthralling characters and mind-blowing plot twists, according to Artur Ekert, CQT's director and co-inventor of quantum cryptography. “A writer has plenty to play with when science allows things to be in two places - or even two universes - at once,” he says. “The result might be funny, tense or even confusing. But it certainly won’t be boring.” Artur is one of the Open category judges.

Another judge is Colin Sullivan, editor of Futures, Nature’s own science-themed fiction strand. “Science fiction is a powerful and innovative genre,” Colin says. “We are excited to see what kinds of stories quantum physics can inspire.”

We previously ran a Quantum Shorts competition for fiction in 2013. We're featuring the winning stories from 2013 on this site. Find all the entries from 2013 on the archived Quantum Shorts 2013 wesite. 

Quantum Shorts 2014 and Quantum Shorts 2012 were contests for films up to three minutes long. 

 

About the organiser

Centre for Quantum TechnologiesNational University of Singapore

 

This competition is an initiative of the Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT) at the National University of Singapore. CQT brings together quantum physicists and computer scientists to explore the quantum nature of reality and quantum possibilities in technology. Outreach and education are part of its mission.

CQT was established in December 2007 as Singapore’s first Research Centre of Excellence with core funding from the Singapore National Research Foundation and the Ministry of Education.

To read more about CQT, visit quantumlah.org.